fotojournalismus:

Ahmad holds up a photo of his sister in their family farm 20 years ago. He turns his eyes away while describing how after losing access to water, he had to find work in a nearby Jewish settlement. “I became a worker for an Israeli settler from Argentina… It was very painful to watch water running all day long in his farm while my farm, which is only a couple of miles away, was drying out.”A Thirsty Generation: Read More
(via theimeu)

fotojournalismus:

Ahmad holds up a photo of his sister in their family farm 20 years ago. He turns his eyes away while describing how after losing access to water, he had to find work in a nearby Jewish settlement. 

“I became a worker for an Israeli settler from Argentina… It was very painful to watch water running all day long in his farm while my farm, which is only a couple of miles away, was drying out.”

A Thirsty Generation: Read More

(via theimeu)

There are years that ask questions and years that answer.

— Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (via observando)

10,708 notes (7:57)
fafke:

Nature/hippie/vintage/spiritual blog *Following back similar*

fafke:

Nature/hippie/vintage/spiritual blog *Following back similar*

aerbor:

NAN GOLDIN


3,689 notes (2:36)

Your Hand In Mine - Explosions In The Sky

0 notes (8:32)
expressions-of-nature:

Hidden Lake Star Trails, New Mexico USA by Tony Hochstetler

expressions-of-nature:

Hidden Lake Star Trails, New Mexico USA by Tony Hochstetler

fotojournalismus:

Life of a trained monkey in Pakistan

Performing monkeys are a common feature of life in many Pakistani cities where they can be seen doing tricks and entertaining people while dressed up in sparkly outfits and clothes.

For Pakistanis who raise and train the monkeys they are an important source of income in an impoverished country, and they form a strong bond with the animals. The monkeys are usually captured in the wild when they are babies and then trained. A trained monkey can fetch 20,000 to 30,000 rupees ($190 to $285).

One such trainer Ataullah Niazi, 46, owns three monkeys that he says he loves like they are his own children. His monkey can make around 500 rupees (about $5) a day, which helps him feed his family of eight. He’s been doing this type of work since he was 11 years old.

It takes at least three months to train a monkey to dance, salute, shake hands, and perform the other tricks needed, said Niazi. Usually the owners go to the northwestern Swat Valley or the town of Murree, outside of Islamabad, to find the babies.

But animal rights activists criticize the practice of training monkeys to perform. "This is a sheer violation of wildlife laws," said Atif Yaqub, an official at the Pakistan Wildlife Foundation. He said the monkeys are often abused by trainers who beat them with a stick during their training and put a rope around their neck so they don’t run away.

Here is a selection of photos of trained monkeys by Associated Press photographer Muhammed Muheisen.


337 notes (6:36)
I reached that odd point when you are no longer young, and yet you’re still not old. You become a kind of centaur: half the person you used to be, half somebody else; that point when there is more you do not care about and less and less you do - you are in no man’s land; you keep moving, but not because you will get anywhere.

— Benjamin Prado from Not Only Fire (via gravellyrun)

227 notes (6:35)
linforme:

Richard Serra, Intervals

linforme:

Richard Serra, Intervals


53,134 notes (6:32)

artandsuchevan:

"The Little Book of Big Ideas"


87,387 notes (6:32)
biomorphosis:

Tarsier is one of the smallest primate in the world. It thrives mostly in secondary dense forests with a diet of insects. This nocturnal creature has the unique ability of being able to turn its head 180 degrees as well as to jump backward with precision. It is endangered and have a tendency to commit suicide during captivity due to trauma from touching and loud noise.

biomorphosis:

Tarsier is one of the smallest primate in the world. It thrives mostly in secondary dense forests with a diet of insects. This nocturnal creature has the unique ability of being able to turn its head 180 degrees as well as to jump backward with precision. It is endangered and have a tendency to commit suicide during captivity due to trauma from touching and loud noise.

kevinfranzisamonster:

Mission log: Day 79. I truly believe that.

kevinfranzisamonster:

Mission log: Day 79. I truly believe that.

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